The Women of Automattic

Great piece by my coworker Zandy on Women at Automattic and more broadly in tech in general. We need more awesome Automatticians so join us! http://automattic.com/work-with-us/

Revelry Reverie

Something pretty amazing happened yesterday. All the women of Automattic had dinner together to talk about something incredibly important to us: getting more qualified women to apply at our company.

We are lucky. Automattic makes sure that an open position goes to the right person, regardless of gender. A lot of companies work hard at this, and many are getting it right (at least most of the time).

We have noticed, however, that in our case, fewer women apply in the first place. Anyone in a technology or traditionally male-dominated field obviously knows this already. One of the things we discussed was how each of us ended up applying to Automattic – interestingly, many of us believed – no, assumed –  we wouldn’t be qualified enough, and ultimately needed a nudge.

We, as women, can read a job description and see one item that we may be weak on or…

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The sounds of Vancouver

This is a great video showcasing not only the beauty of Vancouver but the sounds of the city that I hear every day. I love Vancouver!

WordCamp Vancouver 2013

I’m super excited to be once again organizing the annual WordCamp in Vancouver. WordCamp Vancouver 2013 will be on Saturday August 17th 2013. Tickets are on sale and our schedule is posted.

The full day event will fea­ture three tracks and will cover top­ics of inter­est for Word­Press users, design­ers, and devel­op­ers of all lev­els from begin­ners to experts, and all those in between.Expect plenty of excit­ing top­ics from indus­try experts.

We have an amaz­ing ros­ter of more than 20 speak­ers this year. So grab your tick­ets and stay tuned!

If you’d like to get updates as my team and I make them available, or if you want to be reminded as these dates approach, please subscribe in the sidebar at http://2013.vancouver.wordcamp.org.

Follow us on Twitter as well: @wordcampyvr (hastag: #wcyvr)

I hope to see some of you there!

WordCamp Winnipeg

I am giving a presentation at WordCamp Winnipeg today. The presentation is pretty similar to the one I gave at WordCamp Victoria back in January; with a few small adjustments.

I’m showing power users and novice developers how to get started with plugin development. I think a lot of people don’t realize how easy it is to get started with plugin development or just how small and simple can be. It doesn’t require 100s of lines of code…

Many WordPress tutorials out there talk about copy this or that to your functions.php file in your theme. However, it’s just as easy to create your own functionality plugin; which makes for easier to maintain code in the future that isn’t theme dependant. I begin this talk with the basics of what a plugin is and how it’s structured. I then explain the hooks (actions and filters API), followed by a very simplistic demo. I then give some pro tips and talk about some of the most commonly used WordPress APIs in plugins, as well as promote coding standards. A second more in-depth demo is then presented. Finally, I discuss security in plugins and share some resources for developers and users to further learn from.

Here are the slides from the presentation, which you can also get as a PDF.

At WordPress, Happiness is Automattic

This is some really good insight of what it’s like at Automattic; from my new coworker Jason.

Unencumbered by Facts

On the first of May, I started a new job at Automattic, the company behind WordPress.com. I was hired as a “Code Wrangler,” but to date I have not written a lick of code. This is because for the first three weeks new employees must participate in a customer support rotation. I know what you are thinking: “Let the software engineers communicate directly with customers? I saw Office Space, so I know that’s a bad idea!” or maybe “Bummer, customer service is a thankless soul-sucking quagmire of loathsomeness.” Surprisingly, neither one of these normally valid assumptions is true in this case. So what makes working at Automattic so special that software engineers can enjoy communicating directly with users and customer service ends up being rewarding and fun? Quite a few things actually.

The customer service team is known as the “Happiness Team,” and its members are “Happiness Engineers.” When I…

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Custom post type and metadata support in the REST API

An internal tool that I’m building at Automattic is using the WordPress.com REST API. As part of that tool, I needed access to custom post types and post metadata, so I’ve added both to our REST API. And now anyone on a Jetpack-powered site can also use this part of the REST API. Find out the details in this developer blog post.

Developer Resources

We’ve recently made some updates to the REST API which is available here on WordPress.com and for any Jetpack-enabled site that has the REST API module activated. The API now has full read and write support for custom post types and post metadata.

You can specify a post’s post type when you create or edit it. If you’re fetching a single post, you will receive its post type in the response. Of course, you can also specify a post type when fetching a series of posts. In all cases the parameter to use or look out for is type.

You can also query posts by metadata using the new meta_key and meta_value parameters. You can add, update, delete or retrieve a post’s metadata when creating, editing or getting a single post, using the new metadata parameter which accepts an array of metadata keys, ids, previous_value

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Cidade Maravilhosa

I recently went to Rio de Janeiro as a guest to the Guided Transfer team at Automattic. I’ve posted photos on my photo blog from the trip, but here’s a great selection of more amazing shots by my coworker Hew.

With Posterous shutting down on April 30th, now’s a great time to move your stuff over to WordPress.com if you had a Posterous account. I worked on the importer that makes this possible!

The WordPress.com Blog

We think it’s important that you own the content you create online, which is why we make it simple to import or export all your data — you wrote it it, it’s yours, and you can take it where you’d like. If you want to become a part of the WordPress.com community but have been posting on Tumblr, Blogger, LiveJournal, Posterous, or other services, you can move your whole oeuvre over with a few clicks. (It’s just as easy to leave, but we’d miss you!)

This also means that if you’re blogging with a service that’s phasing out, as Posterous is doing on April 30, it’s easy to keep your site going by setting up a WordPress.com account and importing all your content. (Check out the Posterous blog announcement for more details on the change.)

We know it can be rough leaving a tool that you know and…

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Current status: co-working with a great team of guys in Herzliya, Israel (near Tel-Aviv). Here we are together earlier today: I’ve been posting a bunch of other photos from the trip on my photo blog as well: http://photos.jkudish.com/…. Read More

WordCamp Victoria: Plugin Development 101

Today I’m giving a presentation at WordCamp Victoria 2013 where I’m showing power users and novice developers how to get started with plugin development. I think a lot of people don’t realize how easy it is to get started with plugin development or just how small and simple can be. It doesn’t require 100s of lines of code…

Many WordPress tutorials out there talk about copy this or that to your functions.php file in your theme. However, it’s just as easy to create your own functionality plugin; which makes for easier to maintain code in the future that isn’t theme dependant. I begin this talk with the basics of what a plugin is and how it’s structured. I then explain the hooks (actions and filters API), followed by a very simplistic demo. I then give some pro tips and talk about some of the most commonly used WordPress APIs in plugins, as well as promote coding standards. A second more in-depth demo is then presented. Finally, I discuss security in plugins and share some resources for developers and users to further learn from.

Here are the slides from the presentation:

Let me know if you have any questions, using the comments below. And if you’re at WordCamp Victoria while you view this, come say hi!

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